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Tesla Model 3 tops list of vehicles that bring the most joy

first_imgTesla Model 3 is topping many lists these days like best-selling all-electric vehicles, best value retention, best-selling premium vehicles in the US, but now it is adding another one to the list: the vehicle that ‘brings the most joy’. more…The post Tesla Model 3 tops list of vehicles that ‘bring the most joy’ appeared first on Electrek. Source: Charge Forwardlast_img

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Heres One Super Wacky Way To Charge Your Tesla

first_imgSome people will do anything to avoid using reverse.The Tesla Model S comes fully equipped with a reverse gear as standard equipment Heck, even the Radio Flyer version of the all-electric sedan has a reverse gear. So, what’s going on in this picture? We wish we knew because, like you, we have questions.More about the Tesla Supercharger Tesla Now Operates Over 12,000 Superchargers At 1,400 Stations Source: My E-Life Now! Tesla Rolls Back Supercharger Price Increases To Appease Owners The picture, which we found on the My E-Life Now! Facebook page (embedded below) unaccompanied by any sort of explanation, appears to show a gentleman calming watching a Model S as it sucks electrons from a Tesla Supercharger. He seems blissfully unaware of the fact that he is in contravention of rule nine of the top ten (formerly-unwritten-but-now-written) Supercharging  etiquettes. That is, “park properly.”For what might seem like obvious reasons, we won’t even mention the fact that he should be using the station on the other side of his car (if it is, actually, his car). We’re also going to refrain discussing the fact that standing outside your car while it charges for half an hour or so is kind of weird.If you have any idea about what’s going on here, please feel free to enlighten us in Comments. For our part, we thought it may have something to do with either a faulty gear selector or an extreme aversion to backing up. However, it’s clear that when they decide to leave, reverse is likely going to be necessary. For now, we’re going to file this under “Things that make you go hmm.”center_img Source: Electric Vehicle News Tesla Supercharger Gets Vandalized: Images Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 12, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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2019 Hyundai Kona Electric Edmunds Editors Choice Best EV Video

first_imgWe can’t wait until these cars start stealing awards in other categories.It comes as no surprise that the 2019 Hyundai Kona Electric is deemed the “Best EV” for 2019 according to the editors at Edmunds. It’s the only electric vehicle to earn an editors award this year. The rub here is, however, that an electric car must win in the category of “Best EV.” We’re looking forward to a time in the near future when electric vehicles don’t have their own separate category for these awards, and more EVs can begin to rob gas-powered cars of their rein. It surely has happened before, but it needs to become the norm.Additional Hyundai Kona Electric Coverage: Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on February 13, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle News The Kona Electric continues to garner plenty of praise from a wide variety of reviewers and publications. As Edmunds reiterates, it has a long range, enjoyable driving dynamics, striking good looks, and a nice interior. To top it off, the Kona Electric is well-priced, offers loads of features, and comes with an industry-leading warranty. We hope that eventually Hyundai will produce it in large quantities and make it readily available to the masses.What do you think of the Kona Electric. Leave us your opinion in the comment section below.Video Description via Edmunds on YouTube:2019 Hyundai Kona Electric: The Best EV | 2019 Edmunds Editors’ ChoiceThe Hyundai Kona Electric won Best EV for the 2019 Edmunds Editors’ Choice Awards for its long range, affordable price and pleasing driving experience. It’s a practical daily driver thanks to its agreeable ride and appealing interior. It looks good, too.Edmunds’ experts test over 200 vehicles per year on our test track. We also test them in the real world using a loop of city streets, freeways and winding canyons. The data we gather and the analysis we perform results in our ratings. They’re based on 30-plus scores that cover performance, comfort, interior, technology, utility and value.For the 2019 Edmunds Editors’ Choice awards, we’ve distilled these rankings to the most relevant vehicle categories for most shoppers: sedan, luxury sedan, SUV, luxury SUV, truck, electric vehicle, and sports car.Each winner has undergone rigorous scrutiny by the Edmunds editorial team to ensure it’s the best vehicle for shoppers in its respective category.Outside of providing a vehicle to facilitate the review, Edmunds determined these awards without manufacturer involvement. Hyundai Kona Electric Vs Kia Niro EV, The Autobahn Efficiency Edition Hyundai Kona Electric Gets Priced In U.S: SEL, Limited, Ultimate Source: Electric Vehicle News Hyundai Kona Electric Road Trip From Los Angeles To Las Vegas: Videolast_img read more

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Kia Soul EV introduced as 2020 Kia eSoul in Europe with 280

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Kia’s new 2020 Soul EV has been introduced in Europe with a new name: the e-Soul. The Soul will only be sold in Europe as an all-electric model. Kia announced the e-Soul today, and it will make its European debut at the Geneva Motor Show. more…The post Kia Soul EV introduced as 2020 Kia e-Soul in Europe with 280 mile NEDC range appeared first on Electrek.last_img

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Jaguar IPACE Sales Rebound To Almost 1400 In February 2019

first_imgThe official manufacturer data shows that 9,292 I-PACE were delivered in 11 months (5-6 of which were volume deliveries months).Jaguar I-PACE sales – February 2019 Jaguar I-Pace Wins European Car Of The Year Source: Electric Vehicle News Winter Test Of 5 Electric SUV/Crossovers Reveals Real Range February was the 3rd best month of sales so far.Jaguar I-PACE sales in February improved compared to January and hit 1,388. It’s still below the peak of over 2,200, but should go up, especially having additional marketing boost in the form of the 2019 European Car of the Year award.Positive is also that the all-electric I-PACE accounted for 11.3% of total Jaguar volume for the month.Jaguar I-PACE Watch Jaguar I-Pace Electric SUV Take On Snow & Ice: Video Author Liberty Access TechnologiesPosted on March 14, 2019Categories Electric Vehicle Newslast_img read more

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VW threatens to exit important automaker lobbying group over electric vehicle policies

first_imgSource: Charge Forward Volkswagen is amongst the legacy automakers now most invested in electric vehicles and they now threaten to exit an important automaker lobbying group over their policies regarding electric vehicles. more…The post VW threatens to exit important automaker lobbying group over electric vehicle policies appeared first on Electrek.last_img

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Dirty Tesla Owner Finds 15 Pounds Of Dirt In His Model 3

first_imgThere’s dirt, then there’s this amount of dirt.Source: Electric Vehicle Newslast_img

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Grainger honour emulates Redgrave and Pinsent

first_imgShare on Pinterest Wed 10 Dec 2008 19.01 EST Martin Cross Shares00 Share via Email Reuse this content Share on Twitter Share via Email Share on Facebook Since you’re here… Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. First published on Wed 10 Dec 2008 19.01 ESTcenter_img Olympic Games Rowing Topics Share on LinkedIn Annie Vernon, Debbie Flood, Frances Houghton and Katherine Grainger of Great Britain compete in the quadruple sculls in the 2008 Beijing Olympics. Photograph: Alexander Hassenstein/Bongarts/Getty Images Rowing Grainger honour emulates Redgrave and Pinsent Share on Facebook Share on Messenger Katherine Grainger may have failed to win Olympic gold in 2008, but the year has ended brightly for the 33-year-old triple Olympic silver medallist. This week, Grainger, one of Scotland’s most successful athletes, is expected to announce that she will compete in the 2012 Games. And yesterday, she was made a steward of Henley Royal Regatta, while still being active in international competition – a feat that previously only Steve Redgrave and Matthew Pinsent had achieved. Her first silver came in Sydney in 2000 in the woman’s quadruple sculls. Four years later she was the runner-up in the coxless pairs and in Beijing she again came home with a quadruple sculls silver. Support The Guardian Olympic Games 2012last_img read more

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Eight months later one uncomfortable lesson golf cant live without Woods

first_img Saying golf cannot survive without Woods is like saying cycling hasn’t survived without Armstrong.Sure, cycling has lost some of its American audience and the money for American teams has dropped, but many would cycling itself is unchanged. It may even have reverted to its natural order.Golf will survive without Woods. 21 Feb 2009 21:47 Comments 8 Reply Reply Report newest Share on Facebook I dont know about that, even the open reported reduced crowds this year. Tiger gets knocked for being the best. I want to see him back, many others do too.As for his return making things predictable – he’s won 14 majors, there have been what, 50? since he turned pro. Oh and he has been involved in plenty of exciting final days – Bob May/Sergio/Mediate etcHe’s not as dominant as people make out.Golf will survive without him, however he elevates the profile of the sport, how many non-golf fans know who Tiger Woods is? contrast with how many would pick Padraig out of a crowd.Agree with DocZ really, it would be fine without him, it’s better with him. Share via Email Share on LinkedIn Twitter Share via Email Share on Twitter Share Please select Personal abuse Off topic Legal issue Trolling Hate speech Offensive/Threatening language Copyright Spam Other Report What is it with golf journalists and their ‘love in ‘ with Tiger? I haven’t missed him, the European Tour haven’t missed him. The Open, US PGA were all better off without him – so was the Ryder Cup. Sport, in the main, needs to be unpredictable to be interesting – his return will bring the predictability back. That’s not good.Agree with an earlier point, US Golf has missed him – maybe nobody else has. Share on Twitter Eight months later, one uncomfortable lesson: golf can’t live without Woods Loading comments… Trouble loading? golf- 3 posts- one by accident. Editor does that tell you everything you need to know? dead as a doornail. collapsed Share on Facebook Sorry there was an error. Please try again later. If the problem persists, please contact Userhelp AndyRAC Sportblog Share on Facebook 0 1 Share on Twitter comments (8)Sign in or create your Guardian account to join the discussion. Share Reply Reply 22 Feb 2009 1:16 Show 25 Share on Facebook DaveSlats The Open was pretty good without Tiger.The USPGA was also a cracker.Two of the best majors in recent times.Apart from US Open 2008, Woods usually won at a canter and never produced an exciting come-from-behind victory.And it seems from the article Kim and Casey only missed the sponsor’s and ticket sales money the presence of Woods generates for them. Talk about their priorities.It’s only been 6 months, and I didn’t miss him. Shares00 Threads collapsed Order by oldest Facebook Golf doesn’t need Tiger to survive. Golf does need Tiger to maintain it’s current level of revenue.for the US Tour. Tiger doesn’t play many events on the European Tour so whether he’s playing or not shouldn’t make much difference there. Share on Twitter 22 Feb 2009 16:55 21 Feb 2009 11:07 Email (optional) Share | Pick Share Share on Facebook Facebook | Pick Reason (optional) Since you’re here… unthreaded | Pick Reply Meet Brendan Jones, a professional golfer whose life, like that of a cartoon character blissfully unaware there is a 20-tonne truck steaming his way, may be about to take a dramatic and possibly ugly turn. “I don’t have very much on the agenda,” the 33-year-old Australian said the other week – an innocuous enough observation to which there is only one response: well, you do now, mate.Injuries and withdrawals may yet have an impact on the draw for the first round of the WGC World Match Play Championship in Arizona, which begins on Wednesday, but as things stood yesterday morning, Jones was due to play Tiger Woods in what will be the world No1’s first competitive round of golf since beating Rocco Mediate in a play‑off to win the US Open last June. Such are the privileges of the world’s 64th-ranked golfer.It will be a big day for Jones, who has plied a moderately successful career on the Japanese tour. It will be a big day for Woods, who has known nothing but golf since he was a toddler. And it will be a big day for professional golf, which has learned the uncomfortable lesson over the past eight months that one man may indeed be bigger than the sport. “I’m now ready to play again,” Woods declared on his website. It was a brief statement but also weirdly pompous, as if prompting those who read it to make a note: where were you when Tiger Woods announced his comeback from injury?As it happens, the caravan of professional golf was in two places: Perth, Australia, for the Johnnie Walker Classic, and Los Angeles, California, for the Northern Trust Open. The sense of relief was palpable in both. “I think we need him. It keeps the sponsors happy, which is a very important factor,” said the Englishman Paul Casey in Perth. “He wouldn’t be back if he wasn’t fit and well and that could be quite ominous because he’ll be raring to go. I think that he’s going to be stronger and fitter and he’s going to be better than he was before.”Meanwhile Anthony Kim, the young American player promoted as golf’s “next big thing” in Woods’s absence, sounded delighted that he would no longer be required to carry such an onerous burden. “It’s great for golf,” he said. “I’m sure ticket sales will go right up. He’s a friend of mine so I’ll be glad to see him, and I’m sure his golf game will be top-notch. We’ll see if I have the chance to play against him next week.”At the Riviera country club in Los Angeles, the mood was almost giddy. The PGA tour is by far the wealthiest and most powerful organisation in golf but it has suffered badly in the economic slump, losing sponsors and confidence in equal measure. With a reported £200m in reserves, it would be able to maintain its current level of prize money and marketing but there are some things money cannot buy, not least Woods’s stature and charisma.Suffice to say that the past eight months have been a ­chastening experience for the PGA tour’s commissioner, Tim Finchem, who, if he did not know before, knows now that he is the second most important man in golf. Within minutes of the ­publication of Woods’s statement, the website of the PGA tour had been transformed into a shrine in his honour. “We are delighted Tiger is returning to ­competition and look forward to watching him compete next week,” Finchem said.The sentiments were shared on the practice range at the Riviera country club. Woods is both feared and revered among his peers, so it was unlikely anyone would be publicly indifferent or disdainful. But there was genuine delight that he is returning to the sport.There was a great deal of mirth, too, that he had chosen to make his announcement on the day that Phil Mickelson (who, curiously for a man with a sunny disposition and talent to burn, is neither revered or feared by his peers) had signed for a round of 63 to take the lead at the Northern Trust Open. Like the support act at a U2 concert the American left-hander enjoyed a brief moment of glory before being kicked off the stage to make way for the main act.”I imagine this has been the time of Tiger’s life,” said Geoff Ogilvy, the 2006 US Open winner. “No airplanes, not having to deal with what he always deals with. But it’s been seven months. He’ll be hungrier than ever before. From golf’s point-of-view it is good to have him back, and in this economy we need things that are good for the sport.”Ogilvy, the Australian who is ranked eighth in the world, is one of the players who might reasonably be expected to take advantage while Woods plays his way back into competitive form. Not that he is making any assumptions about the rest of the season or even about next week.”Anybody can beat you in match play,” Ogilvy said of Woods’s immediate prospects. “You can play well and lose. But if he starts winning and gets his bearings, we’ve all seen it before. He usually goes all the way.” lefthalfback tomwolfe 100 Facebook Reply Share Share 0 1 Share on Messenger Facebook 22 Feb 2009 0:05center_img First published on Fri 20 Feb 2009 21.07 EST DocZ 21 Feb 2009 22:59 Golf Share on Twitter Share on Twitter Share Share on Facebook expanded oldest Facebook Ozah Twitter Fri 20 Feb 2009 21.07 EST Share on Facebook | Pick Facebook Reuse this content,View all comments > 0 1 21 Feb 2009 13:48 All Tiger Woods Twitter | Pick 0 1 … we have a small favour to ask. The Guardian will engage with the most critical issues of our time – from the escalating climate catastrophe to widespread inequality to the influence of big tech on our lives. At a time when factual information is a necessity, we believe that each of us, around the world, deserves access to accurate reporting with integrity at its heart.More people are reading and supporting The Guardian’s independent, investigative journalism than ever before. And unlike many news organisations, we have chosen an approach that allows us to keep our journalism accessible to all, regardless of where they live or what they can afford. But we need your ongoing support to keep working as we do.Our editorial independence means we set our own agenda and voice our own opinions. Guardian journalism is free from commercial and political bias and not influenced by billionaire owners or shareholders. This means we can give a voice to those less heard, explore where others turn away, and rigorously challenge those in power.We need your support to keep delivering quality journalism, to maintain our openness and to protect our precious independence. Every reader contribution, big or small, is so valuable. Support The Guardian from as little as $1 – and it only takes a minute. Thank you. Report 0 1 Share on Twitter Topics Tiger Woods will make his comeback to the golf course next week. Photograph: Sam Greenwood/Getty Images Share on Pinterest Close report comment form Share on Twitter yubeingfunny | Pick I’m sick and tired of Donnegan. Why can’t the Guardian hire a real golf correspondent? Is it perhaps because golf is seen as a white middle class sport so that it doesn’t ‘deserve’ a specialist reporter.Golf will survive very well without Tiger Woods, there may be less revenue in the game but so what. In fact his absence could be a blessing in that a lot of the ‘new’ golfers and supporters who have no real feel the history and uniqueness of the sport will disappear. | Pick GonePostal 25 Sportblog Twitter This comment was removed by a moderator because it didn’t abide by our community standards. Replies may also be deleted. For more detail see our FAQs. Support The Guardian 50 Report Twitter blogposts Report Facebook 23 Feb 2009 14:00 Share on Facebook Report recommendations 0 1 Twitter Report Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on WhatsApp Lawrence Donegan Sign in or create your Guardian account to recommend a comment Tiger Woods Twitter Report Tiger Woods’s absence through injury has only enforced the belief that he is bigger than the sport Reply 0 1 View more commentslast_img read more

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Electronics Recycling Fraud in Washington StateToxic Conditions – Avoid Thurston Countys Pattison

first_imgOne of the largest electronic recycling companies in Washington is facing multiple state investigations after it was caught exporting televisions with hazardous materials to unregulated facilities in Hong Kong.Authorities say Seattle-based certified electronics recycler Total Reclaim admitsto withholding information about the exports after a nonprofit group placed GPS tracking devices inhe TVs and tracked their journey.Both the Washington Department of Ecology and it’s counterpart in Oregon launched investigations into whether Total Reclaim violated their state hazardous waste laws.Total Reclaim owners Craig Lorch and Jeff Zirkle blame a bad commodities market for copper and plastic for the shipping.last_img read more

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Dogs may have come from Nepal or Mongolia argues new genetic study

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Emailcenter_img The next time you gaze deep into your pooch’s eyes, imagine the high plateaus of Mongolia or the mountains of Nepal. The latest analysis of canine DNA suggests that dogs first arose there, not in Europe, the Middle East, or southern China as others have suggested. Researchers don’t think this is the final word about where man’s oldest friend came from, but they are pleased with these additional data.“[It’s] a truly novel paper from many different perspectives, and perhaps not surprisingly, a novel result as well,” says Greger Larson, an evolutionary biologist and dog domestication expert at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom, who was not involved with the work. “Adding central Asia now means that everyone with a favorite region can point to at least one paper that supports their suspicions regarding the geographic origins of dogs.”For decades, geneticists, archaeologists, and evolutionary biologists have been trying to trace the history of Canis lupus familiaris (dogs), with conflicting results. Genetic studies have proven challenging because the explosion in canine breeds over the last couple of centuries has obscured the dogs’ evolutionary history. “You don’t get a picture of what went on 20,000 years ago,” about the time dogs may have been domesticated, says Adam Boyko, a geneticist at Cornell University. So Boyko decided to look at dogs that live in isolated places and that are typically left alone to mate as they see fit. He and his brother traveled around the world sampling DNA from about 549 “village” dogs—animals that often don’t really belong to anyone but hang around people anyway—from 38 countries. Boyko and his Cornell postdoc Laura Shannon then compared these dogs’ genomes, as well as the genomes of more than 4500 purebreds from 161 breeds, at almost 189,000 spots along their chromosomes.“It’s a really comprehensive work including all kinds of markers, and a fairly good geographical coverage,” says Peter Savolainen, an evolutionary geneticist at the Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, who has also sampled dogs from around the world to determine their evolutionary birthplace. “So, it gives a good picture of the overall genetic relations among today’s dogs.”Village dogs had a much wider variety of genetic differences than purebred dogs and thus are better sources of historical data, Shannon, Boyko, and their colleagues report online today in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. These dogs had experienced different degrees of infiltration from European canines: African dogs have relatively few European dogs in their past, whereas dogs in the South Pacific came almost exclusively from European stock, they discovered. Such a strong European influence also obscures the historical signal, so Boyko’s team focused on data from indigenous dogs with little modern European influence.In this subset, the team homed in on the number of differences at spots located close to one another along their genomes. This indicated how far back in time these dogs descended from a common ancestor—and where this happened. The analysis pointed toward central Asia as the place where dogs likely transitioned from wolves. It also indicated that dogs then moved into east Asia and elsewhere. They were not able to pin down a date for this transition.  Boyko suspects that between 50,000 and 10,000 years ago, grey wolves and humans were hunting large mammals like elk in central Asia. But increasing human density, climate change, or other factors may have resulted in scarcities in these prey, such that wolves began scavenging to survive. Hanging around human encampments led to smaller, tamer animals that may have begun to cooperate with people, kicking off domestication.Not everyone agrees with the team’s findings. Boyko’s sample didn’t include animals from south or central China, and if they had “it might possibly have indicated these regions instead,” says Savolainen, whose work suggests just that. Robert Wayne, an evolutionary biologist and dog domestication expert at the University of California, Los Angeles, is also skeptical: One lesson learned from genetic studies of dog domestication is that looking at dogs living today “are a poor guide to domestication events which may have occurred more than 27,000 years ago.” To get around that problem, Wayne, Savolainen, and Larson are now looking at fossil DNA as well as modern DNA. However, the new study will be of great help for this work, Larson says. “Once we have the ancient data, we can compare it against [Boyko’s] to really get to grips with where and when dogs were domesticated.”last_img read more

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Scientists luck upon a new way to make a rainbow

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe By Adrian ChoFeb. 27, 2019 , 1:05 PM Chemists have stumbled across a new way to separate reflected light into the colors of the rainbow—a phenomenon known as iridescence. The surprisingly simple technique, which is something of a hybrid of previously known ones, could have applications both scientific and aesthetic.“It’s really cool,” says Kenneth Chau, an optical engineer at the University of British Columbia in Kelowna, Canada, who was not involved in the work. “I’m surprised I didn’t see it in the lab myself.”In iridescence, an object reflects different colors at different angles, separating white light into its constituent colors. One way to achieve it is through refraction, the bending of light as it passes from one translucent medium to another. For example, a rainbow emerges when light bends as it enters spherical raindrops, bounces off the back of them, and then bends again as it exits the drops. The entire process redirects different colors at slightly different angles, spreading them to create the rainbow. Email Scientists luck upon a new way to make a rainbowcenter_img Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Iridescence can also arise when a thin translucent film lies atop a reflective surface, like oil on a puddle. Some light waves reflect off the top of the film and some from the bottom. Depending on the thickness of the film, the angle at which it’s viewed, and the wavelength of the light, the waves will recombine and interfere to either reinforce each other or cancel each other out. Such thin-film interference gives an oily puddle its colorful stripes.Finally, iridescence can arise through diffraction, when light reflects off a more complicated periodic structure, such as the grooves in a compact disk. Again, the light waves rebounding from the grooves can interfere to reinforce or cancel one another, depending on the wavelength of the light and the angle at which it is viewed. Such diffraction explains the brilliant colors of some butterfly wings and humanmade photonic crystals.Now, Lauren Zarzar, a materials chemist at Pennsylvania State University in State College, and colleagues report producing iridescence in a new way. They happened across the effect in early 2017, when they cooked up micron-size spherical droplets containing two types of oil in which the lighter oil formed a lentil-shaped upper layer the researchers hoped to use as a lens. But surprisingly, when illuminated from above, the edges of the lentils glowed with a color that depended on their size and the angle at which they were viewed, the team reports today in Nature.Zarzar says her group certainly wasn’t the first to witness the effect. “People have come up to me and said, ‘Oh, I know exactly what you’re talking about! I’ve seen it, too.’” Yet, a literature search revealed no mention of it. Researchers assumed it must be a refraction or diffraction effect, but those schemes couldn’t fit the data, Zarzar says.Clarity came only with the computer simulations performed by Sara Nagelberg and Mathias Kolle, mechanical engineers and team members at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge. Their analysis showed the iridescence emerges through a new mechanism that blends certain elements of the previously known ones.In the end, the effect can be demonstrated and most easily explained in a much simpler system: water droplets that condense and hang from the underside of the lid of a petri dish. Light waves entering near one edge of a droplet can bounce two or more times off the dome of the droplet before emerging near the other edge—much as light reflects off the back of a raindrop in a rainbow. However, the light waves entering at slightly different distances from the center of the droplet can bounce different numbers of times. And waves bouncing different numbers of times can interfere and reinforce each other, as in diffraction or thin-film interference. As a result, different colors emerge at different angles, which can be controlled by changing the size of the droplet.“We were really racking our brains for quite some time,” Zarzar says. “No other explanation came close to matching the effect.” Chau says, “They did a great job doing detailed experiments and simulations to see how the effect arises.”The new effect could be related to one called a glory that is sometimes seen by airplane passengers flying over clouds. If the sun shines from directly above, the plane’s shadow below will appear surrounded by rainbowlike bullseye. That effect is thought to arise from the interference of light waves reflecting within water droplets in the clouds.Engineers already use thin films and refractive particles to create iridescence in video displays, paints, and decorative wall coverings. With its simplicity and adjustability, the new effect could open ways to color the world. It has one obvious limitation, Chau says: The incident white light has to come from a specific direction, so the effect won’t work in ambient light. Still, “Humans are always looking for new and different ways to produce artificial color,” he says. “I foresee that this will definitely allow for a lot of exploration.”last_img read more

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Sharing Black Spaces With White Gentrifiers

first_imgHoward students and alumni have spoken out about the controversy, showing that the problem is deeper than people walking their dogs.“When I attended Howard, the neighborhood was predominantly African American,” Jessica Mortime, a 2009 graduate, told Bustle recently. “So it’s been a dynamic shift as gentrification continues to hit the Shaw district. Generally when you move into a neighborhood, you respect the norms and the culture of what’s happening around you. And I think that we live now in a world where people just don’t care.”A current student complained of the high-end restaurants popping up around the neighborhood that she said have not only been expensive but also unwelcoming.“There was a burger place literally down the street from my dorm that up and left really fast because they couldn’t afford to pay [rent] anymore, and now they’ve been replaced by this very expensive restaurant,” film major Maya McCollum said. “When you walk in you feel like they’re staring at you because they don’t think you’re able to afford it or able to be in that area.”McCollum also mentioned the increase in policing in the area, which she attributes to the city accommodating the new residents.The Black population in the nation’s capital also known as Chocolate City has been steadily decreasing for decades, shrinking from 538,000 in 1970 to 309,000 in 2010. Conversely, Meanwhile, the white population has grown over that same time.The metropolitan D.C. area was listed as having the 9th most expensive cost of living in the U.S., according to USA Today. As the city’s neighborhoods become whiter, Black residents will likely be faced with the same limited options as those in New York and San Francisco, where gentrification is off the meter: Stay and learn to share those same historical spaces with your new neighbors, who have in many cases ignored the culture they inherit, or flee to more affordable pastures, which are becoming increasingly rarer. The paling population in Washington, D.C., has aimed its gentrifying sights on one of the city’s most prized cultural inventions: go-go music.https://t.co/PU4WuUJHms— NewsOne (@newsone) April 8, 2019“Our Commencement Ceremony is the ultimate long walk that symbolizes a sacred tradition,” Howard President Wayne A. I. Frederick wrote in a statement. “The Howard University community wants to see this area remain pristine and symbolic of all that Howard University represents.”That episode followed protests after gentrifiers tried to silence the city’s signature Go-Go music that blared religiously from speakers at Metro PCS after a resident in one of the newly built upscale condos across the street complained of the noise level. Tensions have been high in historically Black neighborhoods in Washington, D.C., being overtaken by gentrification at a faster rate than anywhere else in the U.S. Most recently, Howard banned local residents from walking their dogs on campus after students complained about their new white neighbors coming to The Yard, a cultural landmark at the historically Black college, for all the wrong reasons. One white man who said he lived nearby even suggested incredulously that the campus, which has been in its same locations for more than 150 years, relocate if the school didn’t want to accommodate the new residents’ desire to let their dogs poop anywhere. Gentrification , Go-Go music , Howard Univeristy Watch Gentrifier Whitesplain Why He Wants D.C. To Lose Some Of Its Black Culture SEE ALSO:Gentrification Displaces D.C.’s Longtime Black ResidentsThe Racist Methods That Allow Gentrification To Thrive In New York City Crime in Shaw Neighborhood - Washington, DC center_img Morehouse Students Take To Social Media And Claim Sexual Harassment Complaints Were Ignored More By Megan Sims Jamaican Republican Who Is Running Against AOC Supported Her A Year Ago Crime and Violence in Washington, DC: Park ViewSource: The Washington Post / GettyAs undaunted white folks continue moving into Black communities in a gentrifying trend showing no signs of slowing down across the entire country, one question begs to be answered: Is it possible for Black residents to amicably share their spaces with the new wealthier white neighbors and still retain the community’s culture? White Tears! Former Meteorologist Files Lawsuit Claiming He Was Fired Because Of Diversitylast_img read more

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New way of crafting crystals could speed up flexible electronics

first_imgKelso et al./Science New way of crafting crystals could speed up flexible electronics By Robert F. ServiceApr. 11, 2019 , 2:00 PMcenter_img To make the ultrathin crystalline films used in everything from solar cells to solid state lasers, materials scientists must use complex, expensive machines to lay them down one atomic layer at a time. These techniques craft films into a single crystal without the breaks or defects that would disrupt their electronic and optical properties. But more often, manufacturers use a cheap technique to spin liquids into smooth films, which harden after they are applied to a surface. These coated films rarely form a single crystal, making them serviceable, but inferior.Now, researchers report today in Science that they can “supersaturate” these liquids with precursor compounds, so that as they spin, they form multiple crystals that fuse together into one, unbroken crystal (seen above in an alloy of cesium, lead, and bromine). The new approach, they suggest, could improve light harvesting in solar cell materials called perovskites and ramp up the speed and performance of flexible electronic devices integrated into everything from curved car dashboards to fabrics.last_img read more

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Anthraxcarrying flies follow monkeys through the forest

first_img Country * Afghanistan Aland Islands Albania Algeria Andorra Angola Anguilla Antarctica Antigua and Barbuda Argentina Armenia Aruba Australia Austria Azerbaijan Bahamas Bahrain Bangladesh Barbados Belarus Belgium Belize Benin Bermuda Bhutan Bolivia, Plurinational State of Bonaire, Sint Eustatius and Saba Bosnia and Herzegovina Botswana Bouvet Island Brazil British Indian Ocean Territory Brunei Darussalam Bulgaria Burkina Faso Burundi Cambodia Cameroon Canada Cape Verde Cayman Islands Central African Republic Chad Chile China Christmas Island Cocos (Keeling) Islands Colombia Comoros Congo Congo, the Democratic Republic of the Cook Islands Costa Rica Cote d’Ivoire Croatia Cuba Curaçao Cyprus Czech Republic Denmark Djibouti Dominica Dominican Republic Ecuador Egypt El Salvador Equatorial Guinea Eritrea Estonia Ethiopia Falkland Islands (Malvinas) Faroe Islands Fiji Finland France French Guiana French Polynesia French Southern Territories Gabon Gambia Georgia Germany Ghana Gibraltar Greece Greenland Grenada Guadeloupe Guatemala Guernsey Guinea Guinea-Bissau Guyana Haiti Heard Island and McDonald Islands Holy See (Vatican City State) Honduras Hungary Iceland India Indonesia Iran, Islamic Republic of Iraq Ireland Isle of Man Israel Italy Jamaica Japan Jersey Jordan Kazakhstan Kenya Kiribati Korea, Democratic People’s Republic of Korea, Republic of Kuwait Kyrgyzstan Lao People’s Democratic Republic Latvia Lebanon Lesotho Liberia Libyan Arab Jamahiriya Liechtenstein Lithuania Luxembourg Macao Macedonia, the former Yugoslav Republic of Madagascar Malawi Malaysia Maldives Mali Malta Martinique Mauritania Mauritius Mayotte Mexico Moldova, Republic of Monaco Mongolia Montenegro Montserrat Morocco Mozambique Myanmar Namibia Nauru Nepal Netherlands New Caledonia New Zealand Nicaragua Niger Nigeria Niue Norfolk Island Norway Oman Pakistan Palestine Panama Papua New Guinea Paraguay Peru Philippines Pitcairn Poland Portugal Qatar Reunion Romania Russian Federation Rwanda Saint Barthélemy Saint Helena, Ascension and Tristan da Cunha Saint Kitts and Nevis Saint Lucia Saint Martin (French part) Saint Pierre and Miquelon Saint Vincent and the Grenadines Samoa San Marino Sao Tome and Principe Saudi Arabia Senegal Serbia Seychelles Sierra Leone Singapore Sint Maarten (Dutch part) Slovakia Slovenia Solomon Islands Somalia South Africa South Georgia and the South Sandwich Islands South Sudan Spain Sri Lanka Sudan Suriname Svalbard and Jan Mayen Swaziland Sweden Switzerland Syrian Arab Republic Taiwan Tajikistan Tanzania, United Republic of Thailand Timor-Leste Togo Tokelau Tonga Trinidad and Tobago Tunisia Turkey Turkmenistan Turks and Caicos Islands Tuvalu Uganda Ukraine United Arab Emirates United Kingdom United States Uruguay Uzbekistan Vanuatu Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of Vietnam Virgin Islands, British Wallis and Futuna Western Sahara Yemen Zambia Zimbabwe Mark Bowler/Science Source Humans aren’t the only primates flies follow around. The insects tail monkeys, too, according to a new study, and they can carry deadly pathogens such as anthrax.Researchers followed a group of approximately 60 wild sooty mangabeys (their relative, the gray mangabey, is pictured), small furry monkeys with light-colored eyelids and long slender arms and legs, in the tropical rainforest of Taï National Park in Ivory Coast. They caught flies within the group of mangabeys and at distances up to 1 kilometer away. The researchers found about eight to 11 times more flies inside the group than in the rest of the forest. The same was true for three different groups of chimps.Next, the team gently dabbed nail polish on nearly 1600 flies to find out whether the same group of insects followed the mangabeys, or whether the primates attracted different flies as they moved through the trees. The marked flies kept turning up around the mangabeys, even 12 days later when the group had moved more than 1 kilometer away, the team reports in Molecular Ecology. Click to view the privacy policy. Required fields are indicated by an asterisk (*) Nearly 12% of the flies carried sylvatic anthrax, which causes more than 38% of wildlife deaths in rainforest ecosystems. The researchers hypothesize that flies could be at least partially responsible for the persistent spread of the disease, which is transmitted by a different microbe from the type of anthrax that infects people. A few flies also carried the bacterium that causes yaws, a disfiguring skin disease that affects both humans and animals.Next, the team will explore whether flies follow groups of hunter-gatherer humans around, and whether these fly behaviors have caused primates to change their own behavior over time. Although mangabeys are known to use tools, researchers have not yet observed them wielding fly swatters.*Correction, 12 July, 3:55 p.m.: The original picture that ran with this item was of a chimpanzee, not a monkey. The image has been updated. Email By Eva FrederickJul. 12, 2019 , 1:30 PM Sign up for our daily newsletter Get more great content like this delivered right to you! Country Anthrax-carrying flies follow monkeys through the forestlast_img read more

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Discovery of Military Plane Wreck Could Solve 50yrold Homesick Pilot Mystery

first_imgThe finding of a plane wreck in the English Channel could provide an explanation for an enduring mystery that happened to a U.S. serviceman in 1969. US Air Force mechanic Sergeant Paul Meyer, stationed at RAF Mildenhall in Suffolk, was homesick and reportedly struggling with alcoholism when he got a piece of bad news. On May 22, 1969, Meyer was told he could not return to a US Air Force base in Virginia to see his family.Taking the name of “Captain Epstein,” he took control of a plane, a Hercules transporter C-130, and took off from Suffolk. Meyer was supposedly drunk and not an experienced pilot by any means.Lockheed C-130 Hercules aircraft.In 30 minutes, all contact was lost. Meyer was never seen again, and the plane disappeared as well. A few days later the life raft washed up on the Channel Island of Alderney.It was a mystery that preoccupied professional diver Grahame Knott, and though it took him 10 years, he has located a plane wreck that he says could very well be the one Meyer took.This could bring closure to the question of whether Meyer lost control of the plane and crashed in the Channel or if he was shot down to prevent him from crashing in a densely populated area.Photo Courtesy Deeper Dorset“It cost me a fortune in beer,” Knott told the BBC, “and I had to filter out a lot of chuff.” Reportedly a lot of his research was spent in pubs along the south coast of England, looking for men who operated trawlers and scallop dredgers.“These boats scrape nets along the seabed and occasionally turn up curious pieces of metal — which is what Knott was buying beer to hear about,” said the BBC. “By listening carefully, he could guess whether the objects were likely to have come from aircraft, and if so how old they were, though it was not always easy to know exactly where they had become snagged in the net.”In the spring, Knott hopes to dive to the wreckage again and take photographs so that he can create a computerized 3D image of the crash site.Photo Courtesy Deeper DorsetIt is hoped that air accident investigators will be able to conclude what caused the plane to go down.“We’re story hunters who dive wrecks to satisfy our curiosity,” said Knott. “It’s not like a typical boat wreck — it’s more like a sacred site, especially since Meyer’s family are still alive.”With the Meyer family’s approval, Deeper Dorset launched a Kickstarter campaign to help fund a year-long project to find the plane’s crash site and document the remains.According to the Kickstarter page, the team would use “cutting-edge 3D photogrammetry technology to build detailed models of the underwater wreckage, with the goal of uncovering the truth of what happened to Meyer.”There are many wrecks in the Channel. Eventually, with the information Knott acquired, he was able to narrow down his initial 100 square mile search zone to five target areas in a 30 square mile area of the sea.In March 2018, Knott intensified his search.With members of the Deeper Dorset diving team, he would set out from Weymouth for 16 hour searches. He told the BBC they “had to dodge enormous container ships as they zig-zagged to-and-fro in one of the search zones.”First, they saw sonar readings telling of an object of interest. They then lowered a video camera to take a look. This confirmed it was aluminum, because of the distinctive way the metal corrodes.“Then we spotted a wheel sticking out the sand, then a section of wing with rivets, it just got bigger and bigger,” says Knott.Read another story from us:The mystery of what happened when a drunken mechanic stole a military planeThis was it, the Hercules that had gone missing, he said.The 50th anniversary of Meyer’s disappearance will be May 23, 2019.last_img read more

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Russia will respond to new US troop deployment in Poland lawmakers

first_imgBy Reuters |Moscow | Updated: June 13, 2019 10:01:11 pm “In the event of any conflict, God forbid, the territory of Poland would become a clear target for a retaliatory strike, if there was suddenly an attack on us,” Vladimir Dzhabarov, deputy head of the upper house of parliament’s international affairs committee, told the Interfax news agency.Another lawmaker, ex-commander of Russia’s special forces Vladimir Shamanov, who now runs the lower house of parliament’s defence committee, said he was concerned about the U.S. drones because of their potential to carry nuclear weapons.“The world is gradually slipping towards a dangerous moment comparable to the Caribbean crisis,” Shamanov said, using the Russian expression for the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis – a standoff between the United States and the Soviet Union that brought the world to the brink of nuclear war.“… We will be forced to take retaliatory measures and we have them in our armoury,” Interfax cited him as saying. Explained: Trump pressure? Why OPEC embraced Putin Kulbhushan Jadhav ‘guilty of crimes’, will proceed further as per law: Imran Khan Poland, US troops Poland, Russia, NATO, Donald Trump, Vladimir Dzhabarov, cold war, Ukraine, Indian Expresss The Russian parliament is not normally involved in the decision-making process on foreign affairs, except in situations where the Kremlin requests the upper house’s formal approval for a military operation.  (Doug Mills/The New York Times)Russian lawmakers said on Thursday that a new US military deployment to Poland announced by President Donald Trump would force Moscow to take retaliatory steps, with one saying it would make Poland a target in the event of a conflict. Trump pledged to Polish President Andrzej Duda on Wednesday that he would deploy 1,000 U.S. troops to Poland, a step sought by Warsaw to deter potential aggression from Russia.Sergei Ryabkov, a Russian deputy foreign minister, was quoted by RIA news agency as saying that the move may reflect Washington’s “aggressive intentions”.Members of Russia’s parliament were quick to react to the plan, which also envisages the United States deploying military drones. After successfully hosting World Cup, nobody has questions about Russia: Smertin The Russian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that it sees in the mission “signs of preparations for further large-scale deployments”.Trump announced the Polish deployment ahead of a G20 summit in Japan this month, at which Trump and Putin might meet. Advertising 0 Comment(s) Related News Explained: Western fears about fire accident aboard a Russian submarine Advertising LiveKarnataka floor test: Will Kumaraswamy’s 14-month-old govt survive? More Explained The Russian parliament is not normally involved in the decision-making process on foreign affairs, except in situations where the Kremlin requests the upper house’s formal approval for a military operation.The Kremlin has yet to comment on the new U.S. plans for Poland but President Vladimir Putin said in an interview, published earlier on Thursday, that relations between Moscow and Washington were getting worse and worse.The joint declaration signed by the United States and Poland said the drones being deployed in Poland were a MQ-9 Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance squadron.MQ-9 unmanned aerial vehicles come in versions that carry weapons. But IHS-Jane’s Defence Weekly reported in March, citing an official U.S. military statement, that the MQ-9 Reapers used in the Polish detachment were “currently configured” for unarmed intelligence, surveillance, and reconnaissance missions. Taking stock of monsoon rain Best Of Express Virat Kohli won’t have a say in choosing new coach last_img read more

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Congress Vikramaditya Singh lands in trouble for tweets on 1931 Kashmir agitation

first_img Related News By Express News Service |Jammu | Updated: July 17, 2019 2:00:47 pm Amid tight security, 14th batch of 5,210 pilgrims leave Jammu for Amarnath Advertising J&K: Suspected Pakistani intruder shot dead by BSF personnel Congress' Vikramaditya Singh lands in trouble for tweets on 1931 Kashmir agitation Congress leader Vikramaditya Singh (File Photo)Congress leader Vikramaditya Singh has landed in trouble over his tweets describing July 13, 1931 martyrs as “rapists, criminals and looters”. Kishtwar Chief Judicial Magistrate Sudhir Khajuria has ordered SHO Kishtwar to investigate whether it makes out to be a cognizable offence. Singh is the grandson of late Maharaja Hari Singh, the last Dogra ruler of Jammu and Kashmir. PDP founding member resigns from party, says it has ‘upended’ after Mufti’s death “On 13 July 1931, plunder, loot and rape by criminals & jail breakers in Srinagar city was put to an end. It is a blot on J&K that is glorified as State Martyrs Day,” his tweets read.In July 1931, around 23 people were killed by Dogra forces outside the Srinagar Central Jail when they were giving a call for “Nimaz Azan”, the complainant pointed out, seeking registration of an FIR against Vikramaditya Singh for his tweets. Advertising Directing the SHO to hold a preliminary inquiry, the CJM ordered that “if any cognizable offence is made out, SHO Kishtwar police station is directed to proceed in accordance with law”.The directions came on a complaint filed by district president of People’s Conference Sajjad Ahmed Najjar seeking action against Singh for his “derogatory remarks” against those killed on July 13, 1931, by then Maharaja’s forces in Kashmir. Najjar described it as a deliberate and malicious act on part of the accused to outrage religious feelings of the majority community, saying that the day has an important mention in state’s history and has been declared a public holiday by the government.According to Najjar, Singh had, in his July 13 tweet, written: “Martyrs Day should be honoured for those thousands of hero’s who have sacrificed their lives for our nation”. 1 Comment(s)last_img read more

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Caught on camera Residents flee as huge landslide hits Sichuan province in

first_img Related News ‘We’re almost extinct’: China’s investigative journalists are silenced under Xi Another Canadian detained in China amid diplomatic chill Advertising China GDP growth slows to 6.2% in second quarter The terrifying footage of the incident shows the force of the landslide pushing an enormous amount of rock and debris on to a road. The landslide occurred following persistent heavy rains.center_img By Express Web Desk |New Delhi | Published: July 13, 2019 9:18:09 am China, China landslide video, China landslide video, China rain, landslide video china, indian express, latest news The landslide occurred at about 1:30pm local time due to persistent heavy rains. (Video screengrab)A massive landslide hit China’s Ebian county in Sichuan province on Friday, blocking roads and causing a dam to collapse. In the minute-long video, several people are seen fleeing for their lives as trees and boulders come crashing into the river next to the slope. Several hutments next to the road are seen buried. The landslide caused a dam on the Guanliao river to collapse.According to a statement issued by the Ebian county government, no injuries were reported. Nearly 20,000 cubic meters of rock and debris were removed from the site. The road was closed and vehicles were redirected by traffic police.Severe storms and torrential rains have been battering southern and eastern China. As many as 61 people have been killed and 3,56,000 evacuated, news agency Reuters had reported. Post Comment(s)last_img read more

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Chinese Hackers Linked to Global Attacks on Telcos

first_imgSecurity researchers on Monday reported that Chinese hackers are the likely perpetrators of a series of cyberattacks against telecommunications companies around the world.The campaign, dubbed “Operation Soft Cell,” has been active since 2012, according to Cybereason, an endpoint security company based in Boston.There is some evidence suggesting even earlier activity against the telecommunications providers, all of whom were outside North America, the researchers said.The attackers attempted to steal all data stored in the active directory servers of the organizations, including all usernames and passwords in the companies, as well as other personally identifiable information, billing data, call detail records, credentials, email servers, geo-location of users, and more, according to the report.Based on the tools used in the attacks, such as PoisonIvy RAT, and the tactics, techniques and procedures deployed by the attackers, the campaign likely was run by APT10, a notorious group of Chinese hackers, the researchers pointed out.The U.S. Justice Department last year indicted two members of APT10 for conspiracy to commit computer intrusions, conspiracy to commit wire fraud, and aggravated identity theft.There is some solid evidence APT10 was behind the attacks, such as the way they customized PoisonIvy and the idiosyncratic bread crumbs they left behind, said Sam Curry, chief security officer at Cybereason.”The way the customization is done, the way they write the scripts, is the sort of thing we’ve seen time and again,” he told TechNewsWorld. “There’s a high probability that it’s a Chinese hacker.” The hackers attacked organizations in waves launched over a period of months, the report notes. During that time, they were able to map the target networks and compromise credentials. That enabled them to compromise critical assets — such as production and database servers, and even domain controllers.”Beyond targeting individual users, this attack is also alarming because of the threat posed by the control of a telecommunications provider,” the report states.”Telecommunications has become critical infrastructure for the majority of world powers. A threat actor with total access to a telecommunications provider, as is the case here, can attack however they want passively and also actively work to sabotage the network.”The attack has widespread implications — not just for individuals, but also for organizations and countries alike, the Cybereason researchers said.”The use of specific tools and the choice to hide ongoing operations for years points to a nation state threat actor, most likely China,” they wrote. “This is another form of cyber warfare being used to establish a foothold and gather information undercover until they are ready to strike.”There are similarities between Operation Soft Cell and another telecom attack, suggested Lavi Lazarovitz, a cyber research group manager at CyberArk Labs, an information security company based in Newton, Massachusetts.”This widespread attack on telecommunications companies has similar characteristics to Operation Socialist,” he told TechNewsWorld.Operation Socialist — a CIA and British GCHQ campaign revealed by Edward Snowden — attempted to take control of the Belgian telecommunications company Belgacom.”It leverages privileged accounts and probably shadow admins to allow persistency and control,” Lazarovitz said. Campaigns like Operation Soft Cell are likely to continue without abatement, noted Satya Gupta, CTO of Virsec, an applications security company in San Jose, California.”These attacks will continue for the foreseeable future, as long as there is political tension and unrest in any number of regions,” he told TechNewsWorld. “Infrastructure attacks on all sides are trying to sow uncertainty, which has both political and financial value to the perpetrators.”As for China, it seems content with economic espionage, for the most part, but that could change in the future, too.”As long as we’re involved in trade wars, I’m not as worried as if China starts to feel threatened about its sphere of influence,” said Richard Stiennon, chief research analyst at IT Harvest, an industry analyst firm in Birmingham, Michigan.”If it’s trade wars, China’s target of interest will be the same as it’s always been: economic espionage. If it’s sphere-of-influence stuff, then the targets of interest could escalate dramatically,” he told TechNewsWorld.”We are essentially in a cyber cold war, and many of the same factors still apply regarding escalation of hostilities and the overall desire to avoid an actual war as a result of ongoing activities,” Barracuda’s Tanner added. “Countries will continue to push the boundaries, but a major increase in attacks runs the risk of being seen as an act of war, which no country wants.” Alarming Attack Cold War in Cyberspace Information reaped by campaigns like Operation Soft Cell can be invaluable to a foreign intelligence service, noted Jonathan Tanner, a senior security researcher at Barracuda Networks, based in Campbell, California.”Tracking a target’s daily routines alone can be useful for a number of motivations, ranging from enumerating contacts to asset recruitment, to abduction or assassination,” he told TechNewsWorld.That sort of work traditionally is carried out by surveillance teams, but with technology it’s becoming increasingly easy to gain that information by other means with significantly less manpower, Tanner explained.”The irony with this breach is that many carriers actually sell this data anyway, through third parties such as Zumigo, who then resell it without checking into their buyers backgrounds,” he said.Stolen data from telcoms can be valuable to more than just Chinese intelligence agencies.”This type of attack would greatly help Huawei in their fight to control as much of the 5G space as possible,” said Jonathan Olivera, a threat analyst for Centripetal Networks, a network security company in Herdon, Virginia.”When a country like China relies on surveillance and intellectual property theft to keep its momentum going, it will be hard to stop and prevent expansion,” he told TechNewsWorld.center_img Familiar Playbook The breadth and persistence of the attacks aren’t the only discouraging characteristics of Operation Soft Cell.”This plays out like every other hack that we’ve heard about in a major organization for years and years and years,” said Chet Wisniewski, principal research scientist at Sophos, a network security and threat management company based in the UK.”It’s clear that these big companies are not taking this stuff seriously enough, especially the ones that have sensitive information about us. The giant role these companies play in our lives demands that they take security more seriously,” he told TechNewsWorld.”The stuff that these guys did was stuff any skilled pen tester would do,” Wisniewski said.”The attacks didn’t have any super secret stuff. There were no new zero-day vulnerabilities here — no new tools that no one had ever heard of before. All the stuff was off the shelf. I could teach a college student to how to use it in a semester,” he said.”We know this playbook,” Wisniewski added, “and big companies should be able to defend against it.” Useful Information John P. Mello Jr. has been an ECT News Network reportersince 2003. His areas of focus include cybersecurity, IT issues, privacy, e-commerce, social media, artificial intelligence, big data and consumer electronics. He has written and edited for numerous publications, including the Boston Business Journal, theBoston Phoenix, Megapixel.Net and GovernmentSecurity News. Email John.last_img read more

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